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Tummy Time!

by Maxine
Posted August 18 2010 04:25pm
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When babies are awake, it’s important for them to have some ”tummy time” every day. This helps prevent babies from developing a flat spot on the back of their heads.  It also gives them the chance to develop muscle strength and it encourages them to practice movements that are part of normal physical progress. Daily tummy time prepares babies for important milestones, such as pushing themselves up, crawling and walking.

Before you begin tummy time, wait until your baby’s cord has come off—about a week to 10 days. Be prepared to have tummy time right along with your baby. She may need to be coaxed at first because lifting her head is hard to do. However, she will love your company. Have fun!

Here's more on Flat Head. 

Do you have any fun pictures of your baby enjoying tummy time with you or on his own? Share them with us!

 

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Attachment

by Maxine
Posted August 19 2010 09:37pm
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Babies are born with the need to form close relationships with caring and responsive adults, which are called "attachments." If children don't have the opportunity to develop close, uninterrupted attachments with nurturing adults during the early years, young children will find it more difficult to learn, to become confident and to trust others.


Infants and young children can form consistent attachments with the people who are around them most.
These few important relationships create a sense in your child of what kind of world this is and what her place is in it.

A secure attachment to caring adults helps your child learn to adapt to circumstances more easily, and to overcome difficult situations throughout his life. This kind of attachment helps your child to believe the world is a friendly and safe place. Having a parent or caregiver who understands and responds sensitively to a baby's signals, such as picking baby up and comforting him when crying, helps the baby form a secure, healthy attachment.

Relax, and don't worry about making mistakes.  All parents learn by trial and error. As long as your baby knows she can count on you most of the time, she'll be amazingly flexible and forgiving.
 

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Temperament and Your Preschooler

by Maxine
Posted December 22 2010 06:54pm
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Some preschoolers are more expressive, some more timid. Some are very physically active, and some are more sedate. Some are sensitive to loud noises, while others are not bothered at all. Some thrive when surrounded by people, while others are content to play alone quietly. These differences are what we call temperament, and much of this becomes evident in the first few months after birth. 

As parents, it is important to recognize and accept the basic temperament of your child, so you can respond appropriately. For example, if your child's temperament is timid, introduce new activities slowly and allow time for him to build up confidence. If your child's temperament is highly active, give advance notice of changes, so she doesn't fly off the handle. And, if your child's temperament is easy-going, remember that even though she copes well, you are still needed - so check in and stay connected.

Learn more about temperament and watch our unique Temperament Video featuring our expert, Dr. Carol Crill Russell.

 

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Making bedwetting easier on you and your toddler

by Maxine
Posted August 8 2011 02:54pm
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Bedwetting is challenging for parent and child. There is the waking in the middle of the night, changing clothes, cleaning up, constantly laundering bedding and changing the sheets! It’s a tough time for you both.

Remember, no child purposely wets the bed. And while it can be frustrating or upsetting for both of you, there are ways to make it easier on everyone. Here are several of them:

Try to decrease the amount of fluids your child has before bedtime. Make a routine of having your child go to the bathroom immediately before bed.

Put a plastic sheet on your child's bed and keep extra sets of clean sheets and blankets close by. This makes clean up in the middle of the night a lot easier on both of you, and you don't have to worry about ruining the mattress.

Be supportive. Tell your child you know it's not her fault and let her know that many children take longer to develop this kind of control. Don't expect too much too soon, or punish or shame your child for bedwetting. If you do so, things will only get worse.

If your child is becoming embarrassed about wetting the bed, or you think bedwetting is going on too long, consult your child's physician for more specific strategies. Most children stop by age 5-6 years.

How does your child react when he wets the bed? How do you make it easier for him? Share your comments below!

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