0

Making bedwetting easier on you and your toddler

by Maxine
Posted August 8 2011 02:54pm
Filed under:

Bedwetting is challenging for parent and child. There is the waking in the middle of the night, changing clothes, cleaning up, constantly laundering bedding and changing the sheets! It’s a tough time for you both.

Remember, no child purposely wets the bed. And while it can be frustrating or upsetting for both of you, there are ways to make it easier on everyone. Here are several of them:

Try to decrease the amount of fluids your child has before bedtime. Make a routine of having your child go to the bathroom immediately before bed.

Put a plastic sheet on your child's bed and keep extra sets of clean sheets and blankets close by. This makes clean up in the middle of the night a lot easier on both of you, and you don't have to worry about ruining the mattress.

Be supportive. Tell your child you know it's not her fault and let her know that many children take longer to develop this kind of control. Don't expect too much too soon, or punish or shame your child for bedwetting. If you do so, things will only get worse.

If your child is becoming embarrassed about wetting the bed, or you think bedwetting is going on too long, consult your child's physician for more specific strategies. Most children stop by age 5-6 years.

How does your child react when he wets the bed? How do you make it easier for him? Share your comments below!

0 comment(s)
Login or register to post comments
0

Temper Tantrums – Why they happen and what you can do

by Maxine
Posted September 5 2011 04:55pm
Filed under:

Meltdowns happen, especially during the toddler years. Whether it’s an enticing cupcake at the grocery store that she just has to have, a shiny toy or a desire to stay at the playground when you’ve said it’s time to go – small children can turn a simple ‘no’ into a full-blown tantrum in record time. It can be embarrassing and frustrating for parents – who doesn’t want to lose their cool when they have a screaming two-year-old throwing herself on the ground in front of all the parents at the playground? But there are things you can do to help you stay calm and, hopefully, defuse the situation. And, even if your child refuses to be soothed, remember that all those other parents have been there too!

Our experts get a lot of questions about tantrums – it’s a common problem that parents have to cope with. The first thing to understand is what causes the temper tantrums. The experts say that there are three main reasons:

  1. They’re unable to cope with their feelings. These feelings can be anything from hunger, sickness, confusion, helplessness, frustration, anger or even terror. Being physically upset is the main way for a toddler with a limited vocabulary to express feelings. For example, if you refuse to give in to your child and this makes him feel angry, your child may not be able to cope with his angry feelings. He may express his feelings by having a temper tantrum.  
  2. They’ve learned—from past experience—that temper tantrums are rewarded. If your child gets what he wants once as a result of a tantrum, he is more likely to have temper tantrums to force you to his will.
  3. They want attention. This can stem from feelings of being left out, ignored or lonely.

So now you know why your child is hurling herself onto the grass by the slide, but what can you do to make her stop? 

“Be patient,” suggests Karon Foster, a Registered Nurse and Parenting. “When you stay calm and don’t lose your temper you set a good example in the way you handle the tantrum. If you get angry it will just make things worse.”

And Foster suggests that you don’t worry about what other people around you are thinking. Remember that other parents understand and sympathize and that for every person that is critical there are many who have been there themselves. There are no perfect parents, so just deal with the problem at hand and try not to worry about what others are thinking.

Experts suggest that, as hard as it might be at the time, you shouldn’t give into your child during a tantrum. That can be easier said than done when your child is kicking and screaming in public, but when you give in you just reinforce the idea that tantrums are an effective way to get what she wants. Giving in ups the chances that you’ll be dealing with a lot more tantrums.

Try to soothe your child when she’s having a tantrum. Sometimes it doesn’t work, because she’s too worked up, but it helps to try. Take her to a calm, safe place and let her cry it out. Stay close.

When she’s ready, hold her and offer reassuring comments. Help her talk about what happened, how she felt and why she was angry. It may seem difficult, but discussing the situation can help your child understand and give her the words to deal with her feelings in the future.

If you find that tantrums are happening more and more, or that your child is really having trouble settling down, discuss this with your child's physician.

Did your child have tantrums? Does he still? How do you cope? Share your story with other parents just like you by leaving a comment below!

0 comment(s)
Login or register to post comments
0

Nursery rhymes & your baby's language development

by Maxine
Posted December 4 2011 11:14pm
Filed under:

Did you know nursery rhymes actually improve your baby's language skills; that they play an important role in helping her learn to read and to understand the grammatical structure of language?

And you thought Itsy Bitsy Spider was just entertaining your baby!

Now researchers have found that song-like rhythmic patterns that make rhyming fun are the very thing that draws attention to the rhythm of language. And when you tap or clap along to the beat of the story, you're really helping your child develop an awareness of the syllables and sounds that make up words. For example, in the rhyme Hickory, Dickory, Dock, each syllable can be clapped as you say the word Hick - o – ry (3 claps).

Nursery rhymes also set the stage for early reading by making children more aware of their own language and how sounds are combined to make words that sound alike - like "clock" and "dock".

Reciting nursery rhymes teaches the rhythm of speech and intonation as well as the grammatical structure of language. You can change your intonation to emphasize certain words or phrases, such as "climbed up the water spout " and …"washed the spider out". This emphasis is present in our everyday language. We raise our voices at the end of a question, and pause between sentences or phrases to emphasize a new thought.

Nursery rhymes also help a child articulate or say consonant sounds clearly. In "Hey diddle, diddle, the cat and the fiddle", the "d" sound is repeated several times. The sequence of words makes you use different tongue movements and change the position of your teeth against your lips. So the rhymes help children become more fluent in their speaking skills, and able to pronounce sounds they have trouble with.

Using the classic nursery rhymes below, try these activities with your child.

  • Point out rhyming words and ask your child to find more words in the rhyme that sound like these.
  • Point out words that start with the same sound(s) and ask your child to think of other words that start with the same sound.
  • Using things like a pencil on a tin can, tap out each syllable of the rhyme with a "drum" beat.
  • If your child knows the rhyme well, say parts of it and let him complete it. For example, let him fill in words at the end of lines that rhyme – like dock and clock.

 

Hickory, dickory, dock,
The mouse ran up the clock.
The clock struck one,
The mouse ran down,
Hickory, dickory, dock.

The itsy bitsy spider climbed up the water spout.
Down came the rain and washed the spider out.
Out came the sun and dried up all the rain.
And the itsy bitsy spider went up the spout again.

Hey diddle diddle
the cat and the fiddle
the cow jumped over the moon. The little dog laughed
to see such sport
and the dish
ran away with the spoon.

 

Content provided by Canadian Language and Literacy Research Network

What are your child’s favourite nursery rhymes and how do you use them to support her language development? Share your thoughts with other parents by leaving a comment below.

 

0 comment(s)
Login or register to post comments
0

Nursery rhymes & your toddler's language development

by Maxine
Posted January 4 2012 03:52pm
Filed under:

And you thought Itsy Bitsy Spider was just entertaining your child!

Now researchers have found that song-like rhythmic patterns that make rhyming fun are the very thing that draws attention to the rhythm of language. And when you tap or clap along to the beat of the story, you're really helping your child develop an awareness of the syllables and sounds that make up words. For example, in the rhyme Hickory, Dickory, Dock, each syllable can be clapped as you say the word Hick - o – ry (3 claps).

Nursery rhymes also set the stage for early reading by making children more aware of their own language and how sounds are combined to make words that sound alike - like "clock" and "dock".

Reciting nursery rhymes teaches the rhythm of speech and intonation as well as the grammatical structure of language. You can change your intonation to emphasize certain words or phrases, such as "climbed up the water spout " and …"washed the spider out". This emphasis is present in our everyday language. We raise our voices at the end of a question, and pause between sentences or phrases to emphasize a new thought.

Nursery rhymes also help a child articulate or say consonant sounds clearly. In "Hey diddle, diddle, the cat and the fiddle", the "d" sound is repeated several times. The sequence of words makes you use different tongue movements and change the position of your teeth against your lips. So the rhymes help children become more fluent in their speaking skills, and able to pronounce sounds they have trouble with.

Using the classic nursery rhymes below, try these activities with your child.

  • Point out rhyming words and ask your child to find more words in the rhyme that sound like these.
  • Point out words that start with the same sound(s) and ask your child to think of other words that start with the same sound.
  • Using things like a pencil on a tin can, tap out each syllable of the rhyme with a "drum" beat.
  • If your child knows the rhyme well, say parts of it and let him complete it. For example, let him fill in words at the end of lines that rhyme – like dock and clock.

 

Hickory, dickory, dock,
The mouse ran up the clock.
The clock struck one,
The mouse ran down,
Hickory, dickory, dock.

The itsy bitsy spider climbed up the water spout.
Down came the rain and washed the spider out.
Out came the sun and dried up all the rain.
And the itsy bitsy spider went up the spout again.

Hey diddle diddle
the cat and the fiddle
the cow jumped over the moon.
The little dog laughed
to see such sport
and the dish ran away with the spoon.

 

Content provided by the Canadian Language and Literacy Research Network

What are your child’s favourite nursery rhymes and how do you use them to support her language development? Share your thoughts with other parents by leaving a comment below.

0 comment(s)
Login or register to post comments
Visit Kidobi.com Today!
view counter

MOST POPULAR STORIES

One of our temperament traits, our innate reaction to the world, is First Reaction. Some people love novelty and change while others react with caution to new situations.
Read More »
You can use a variety of Comfort, Play & Teach strategies that are tailored to different temperament traits.
Read More »
What comes to mind when you hear the phrase Positive Parenting? Positive Parenting is the approach to parenting that we believe best supports all aspects of healthy child development.
Read More »

parents2parents
syndicated content powered by FeedBurner

 

FeedBurner makes it easy to receive content updates in My Yahoo!, Newsgator, Bloglines, and other news readers.
Learn more about syndication and Feedburner »

http://feeds.feedburner.com/parents2parents