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Helping your toddler deal with her feelings

by Maxine
Posted December 17 2010 11:51am
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It's a good idea to help your toddler learn to manage his emotions, but remember you don't want to stop young children from having feelings all together. It's much better to help your child learn better ways of dealing with his feelings instead. Here are several things that you can try:

Try to set a good example for your child. When you find yourself getting upset or frustrated, try saying things out loud like, "I'm sure I can get through this if I slow down and think about it." This is a great way to teach your child how to calm himself down and remain in control.

Help your child put what she is feeling into words - teach her what to call different types of feelings.

Talk about the way people in storybooks and pictures are feeling, and talk about what might cause those feelings.

Explain that you understand she's upset or angry, but at the same time let your child know that some behaviours, like hurting others or constantly whining, are not acceptable.

Take your child's feelings seriously and acknowledge how he is feeling. Never say "It's not such a big deal" or "Why are you so upset about that?" Instead, help your child understand that many people have similar feelings on occasion, and some people have them more often. Then discuss the acceptable ways to express them.

Be a positive influence when your child does get upset - by helping to calm him and change the situation into something more positive.

Avoid labeling your child by his feelings, such as "He's always been an angry boy" or "She can't help it, she's shy." Too often, a child will start to believe what is being said, and live up to the label.

If your child's control of her emotions doesn't seem to be improving, consult your child's physician for referrals to appropriate family services in your area.

 

How do you help your toddler cope with her feelings? Leave a comment below and share your story with other parents just like you!

 

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Dehydration

by Maxine
Posted August 18 2010 11:31am
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Dehydration happens when the body doesn’t have enough water to carry out its normal jobs.

Toddlers can become dehydrated quickly and need to be watched carefully. This is especially true during hot weather and illnesses such as fever, vomiting and diarrhea. Watch for signs of dehydration when changing routines, giving new foods or even changing water sources.

The symptoms of dehydration include:

  • Dry eyes
  • Crying with few or no tears
  • Slightly dry mouth
  • Increased thirst
  • Fewer wet diapers than usual
  • Fewer dirty diapers than usual
  • Less active
  • More sleepy or tired than usual
  • Muscle weakness
  • Irritable
  • Headache
  • Dizziness

Severe dehydration includes the following symptoms:

  • Very dry mouth
  • Sunken eyes
  • Skin that stays stuck together and doesn’t spring back when it’s gently pinched then released
  • No urine or wet diapers
  • Intense thirst
  • Your child is difficult to arouse or does not recognize you
  • Fast breathing
  • Fast heart rate
  • Cool, grayish skin colour
  • Very lethargic
  • Loss of weight

When mild dehydration occurs, there are steps you can take to stop this:

  • Offer your child fluids frequently
  • Offer fluids such as popsicles, freezies, or water every hour. Consult your doctor before giving any over-the-counter re-hydration fluid.
  • If you can’t get your child to re-hydrate herself, call her doctor or go to the children’s after-hours clinic. If neither is available, go to the nearest hospital emergency room. It’s always better to take a dehydrated child to medical experts sooner rather than later. Re-hydrating quickly is very important.


If severe hydration occurs, call 911 or go to the nearest hospital emergency room.

You can prevent dehydration in your child by frequently offering her fluids she would normally take. Watch for signs that dehydration is getting worse. This is especially true when she has vomiting or diarrhea.

 

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Your toddler's language development

by Maxine
Posted August 8 2011 03:37pm
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Language skills start unfolding from the very start of your child’s life. During the first 18 months, babies identify the sounds of their language and “practice” using them by babbling. By 18 months, they are able to say about 50 words (but they understand many more). Around the 2nd year, children’s vocabulary increases by leaps and bounds. They learn approximately 9 words per day! By 5 years, most children have mastered the grammar of their language. They are able to tell simple stories and describe events in their lives. While children go through the various stages of language acquisition at their own speed, they tend to hit the major milestones in the same order. Find out more about these milestones.

Provided with permission by:

 

 

 

 

Remember that all children acquire language at their own pace – some abilities may come earlier, others may come later. However, if you are concerned about any aspect of your child’s language, contact the Canadian Association of Speech-Language Pathologists and Audiologists at 1-800-259-8519, and they will guide your to an appropriate referral.

When did your child say her first word? What was it? Were you ever afraid that she was taking to long to start talking? Share you experiences below by leaving a comment.

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Your toddler and learning more than one language

by Maxine
Posted January 4 2012 01:48pm
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Fortunately, most young children can learn two or more languages as they grow up, especially in the years before they go to school. They might show slight delays in vocabulary growth in each language at first, because they are learning two or more sets of words at once. But by the time they have reached grade five, they often have a more advanced knowledge of language than other children who speak only one language.

When a child is learning two languages, she may mix words from both languages into her sentences, but she will eventually learn to separate the languages correctly.

You should go ahead and speak the language you are comfortable with to your child. It's also good to read to him in that language, and use it when you are playing with him, as well.

And remember, it's much better to speak to your child in your native language often than to talk very little because you think you should only speak in English or only French, and you aren't comfortable doing so.

Click here for more on teaching your toddler to speak two languages.

Do you speak more than one language at home? Are you encouraging your toddler to speak both? Post a comment and share your strategies with other parents.

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